Israel has declared war on Hamas after the Palestinian militant group, which the U.S. recognizes as a terrorist organization, launched a surprise attack from Gaza over the weekend, killing more than 900 people in Israeli towns near the Gaza border, per The Associated Press.

News of the attack quickly spread on social media, with images and videos of people taken hostage, killed in their homes, and gunned down at a music festival widely shared.

The Israeli military quickly responded to Hamas’ attack, and now, around 1,200 people have died on both sides of the violent conflict, according to The Associated Press.

On social media, the horrific videos and images from the attack in Israel have continued to circulate. And right now, it might feel like your entire feed is weighing in on the topic or re-sharing stories and videos of the devastation, which can be upsetting, says Hillary Ammon, PsyD, a clinical psychologist at the Center for Anxiety & Women’s Emotional Wellness.

While news broadcasters and writers will usually warn people before showing graphic images or videos, that doesn’t always happen on social media, she points out.

Meet the experts: Hillary Ammon, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist at the Center for Anxiety & Women’s Emotional Wellness. Thea Gallagher, PsyD, is a clinical assistant professor at NYU Langone Health and co-host of the Mind in View podcast. Gail Saltz, MD, is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at The New York Presbyterian Hospital and host of the “How Can I Help?” podcast. Arianna Galligher, LISW-S, is the associate director of the STAR Trauma Recovery Center at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

“The content is being shared and re-shared so quickly, that often warnings are not provided and may land on your timeline before the social media company can blur the image or attach a warning,” Ammon says.

This can activate a fear or anxiety response in you, she says, noting that it can be “traumatizing” to see some of these images. “Sometimes, these images can become ‘sticky’ in an individual’s brain and continue to cause them distress afterward,” she says. “It may also increase overall anxiety about safety, or just raise anxiety levels in general.”

So, if you’re feeling upset after coming across violent images and videos in your feed, know that you’re not the only one, says Thea Gallagher, PsyD, a clinical assistant professor at NYU Langone Health and co-host of the Mind in View podcast.

“We’re empathetic people,” she says. “We can picture ourselves in someone else’s shoes.”

But while experts say these images are understandably disturbing, there are a few things you can do to help yourself deal.

First, check in with yourself.

You know yourself better than anyone else, so you probably have a good sense of what you can and can’t tolerate. Images, videos, and stories like the ones being posted on social media from Israel and Gaza right now can be “triggering” for some, Ammon says.

“My recommendation is to check-in with your personal gauge,” she says. “If you’re noticing persisting distress after learning about these events, it may be beneficial to take some breaks from social media or news consumption.”

If you still want updates, Ammon says you can ask trusted friends or family for information on events. You can still stay informed without diving into disturbing details, says Gail Saltz, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry at The New York Presbyterian Hospital and host of the “How Can I Help?” podcast.

“Turn off the cable news and stop scrolling through online sources that give you images,” she says. “You can take a break and bring down your anxiety level while still staying aware.”

Talk about it.

Connecting with family and friends and talking about what’s on your mind can help you process what you’ve been seeing, Gallagher says.

“This may help you understand why and how it’s impacting you,” she says.

Sit with it for a moment.

Telling yourself not to think about something upsetting can sometimes make it hard to think about, well, anything else, Gallagher points out. So, you may want to carve out a few minutes to just tap into what you’re thinking and feeling.

“It’s okay to sit with some of your sadness,” Gallagher says. “For many, there’s confusion and a lack of understanding around the nuances that exist here. Let yourself sit with those feelings and process them.”

Arianna Galligher, LISW-S, associate director of the STAR Trauma Recovery Center at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, agrees, adding that it’s important to normalize having an emotional response to terrible events.

“Empathy for those who are suffering is part of what makes us human, and we don’t want to get rid of that,” she says.

Do what you can to help.

It’s easy to feel hopeless in situations like this, but Ammon says that doing something to help support others can feel empowering. If you’re looking into donating, you can try International Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, Save the Children, and more.

“Often, it can be beneficial to explore how you can help the populations being impacted in a way that doesn’t force you to consume information about the events,” she says.

If you’ve tried all of these tips and are still struggling, it doesn’t hurt to connect with a licensed mental health professional to talk further.

“If you find that it’s difficult to focus your attention on anything else, if you’re having prolonged difficulty—beyond a day or two—with sleep, if you’re having difficulty functioning at work or school, or if your relationships with others are starting to suffer, it may be helpful to talk with a mental health professional,” Galligher says.

“Counseling can help you process your own emotions and come up with a plan for how you want to move through them in a way that’s healthy, safe and effective.”

Korin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellness, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work appearing in Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Self, Glamour, and more. She has a master’s degree from American University, lives by the beach, and hopes to own a teacup pig and taco truck one day.